Page 981

Australian scientists have created a hangover-free beer! I love science

Australian scientists have created a hangover-free beer! I love science


Hangovers are rough. Some people say that the reason we have hangovers is that when we drink alcohol, we're just borrowing happiness and fun from the next day. In reality, the reason we suffer from hangovers is because alcohol dehydrates our body— and the hangover is a result of that.

Hangovers, which were once considered an inevitable punishment for drinking too much alcohol, may now be preventable thanks to the beer-loving country of Australia. A group of scientists have brewed a hangover-free beer.

The Australian scientists were able to create this miracle drink by adding electrolytes to different types of beer. Unfortunately, it seems as if the hangovers are only really prevented when the electrolytes are added to light beer, as opposed to regular beer.

(Source)


The first traffic light ever created killed someone within a month of being used, but not in the way you would expect!


The very first traffic light was a cold-blooded killer. When it was first put up in 1868, it was installed outside the Houses of Parliament in London, but it only took less than a month before it claimed it's victim. Ironically, it was designed to control traffic to save lives—but the light suddenly exploded and killedthe traffic cop whose job was to operate the traffic light.

An interesting thing about this first light is that is used the same colors that modern traffic lights use. They inventors of the light borrowed the colours from the railroad system, which used the colours red and green! As to why those colours were chosen for the railroad, nobody knows. The best guess people have is that red has always sort of been a signal for danger, and green is a colour that calms people.

(Source)

The first traffic light ever created killed someone within a month of being used, but not in the way you would expect!

The first traffic light ever created killed someone within a month of being used, but not in the way you would expect!


The very first traffic light was a cold-blooded killer. When it was first put up in 1868, it was installed outside the Houses of Parliament in London, but it only took less than a month before it claimed it's victim. Ironically, it was designed to control traffic to save lives—but the light suddenly exploded and killedthe traffic cop whose job was to operate the traffic light.

An interesting thing about this first light is that is used the same colors that modern traffic lights use. They inventors of the light borrowed the colours from the railroad system, which used the colours red and green! As to why those colours were chosen for the railroad, nobody knows. The best guess people have is that red has always sort of been a signal for danger, and green is a colour that calms people.

(Source)


One in three people sneeze when exposed to bright light. But why? People have wondered since the 3rd century BC!

One in three people sneeze when exposed to bright light. But why? People have wondered since the 3rd century BC!


Sneezing due to exposure to bright light, like sunlight, is known as the photic sneeze reflex. About one out of three people are born with this genetic quirk which scientists are still unable to fully explain.

Mostly it is unexplained because there has not been that much research done about it yet. There have been attempts at explaining it, and even Aristotle wondered and wrote about it in his 'Book of Problems' in the 3rd century BC. He proposed that the heat of the sun was probably responsible.

A very simple demonstration by Francis Baker, some 2000 years later, proved Aristotle wrong. He stepped into the sun with his eyes closed and did not sneeze, despite the presence of the heat. He then surmised that the light makes the eyes water, which in turn irritated the nose, resulting in a sneeze.

Neurological experts now agree, however, that the phenomenon is a result of crossed wires in the brain. When we are suddenly exposed to bright light, the optical nerve typically sends a signal to the brain to constrict the pupils. In people with a photic sneeze reflex, some of that signal is picked up by the trigeminal nerve. That is the nerve that is triggered by an irritation in the nose. Due to this mixed message received by the brain, it registers the signal as an irritation in the nose, resulting in a uncalled-for sneeze.

Although the gene responsible for this 'sun sneezing' has not been identified yet, a publication in 1978 was more concerned about renaming the photic sneeze reflex. They suggested Autosomal-dominant Compelling Helio-Ophthalmic Outburst syndrome: ACHOO.

Well, bless you!

(Source)


One in three people sneeze when exposed to bright light. But why? People have wondered since the 3rd century BC!


Sneezing due to exposure to bright light, like sunlight, is known as the photic sneeze reflex. About one out of three people are born with this genetic quirk which scientists are still unable to fully explain.

Mostly it is unexplained because there has not been that much research done about it yet. There have been attempts at explaining it, and even Aristotle wondered and wrote about it in his 'Book of Problems' in the 3rd century BC. He proposed that the heat of the sun was probably responsible.

A very simple demonstration by Francis Baker, some 2000 years later, proved Aristotle wrong. He stepped into the sun with his eyes closed and did not sneeze, despite the presence of the heat. He then surmised that the light makes the eyes water, which in turn irritated the nose, resulting in a sneeze.

Neurological experts now agree, however, that the phenomenon is a result of crossed wires in the brain. When we are suddenly exposed to bright light, the optical nerve typically sends a signal to the brain to constrict the pupils. In people with a photic sneeze reflex, some of that signal is picked up by the trigeminal nerve. That is the nerve that is triggered by an irritation in the nose. Due to this mixed message received by the brain, it registers the signal as an irritation in the nose, resulting in a uncalled-for sneeze.

Although the gene responsible for this 'sun sneezing' has not been identified yet, a publication in 1978 was more concerned about renaming the photic sneeze reflex. They suggested Autosomal-dominant Compelling Helio-Ophthalmic Outburst syndrome: ACHOO.

Well, bless you!

(Source)

Video

users online