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15 Shocking Facts About Smoking

The radiation from smoking a pack of cigarettes a day compares to almost 2,000 chest x-rays!


Ever been annoyed when you had to strap on that lead vest while getting an x-ray? Just think of all the radiation you would be exposed to if you didn’t have that blocking a lot of it. Now then think that if you smoke cigarettes, you get that much radiation anyway! Scientists had trouble determining why exactly cigarettes were so dangerous and caused so many health risks. 

Statistically, the chemicals in tobacco are far less dangerous than most people think, and the numbers don’t exactly add up. However, scientists have determined that tobacco is so bad for you because it’s actually radioactive. In the 1930’s farmers began using a cheap fertilizer called apatite, which causes the tobacco to taste sweet, but also has uranium in it. By inhaling the smoke from this apatite, we inhale radioactive particles, severely damaging our body and organs. 


Ever thrown a penny into a fountain for good luck? The Romans used to do something even stranger with their pennies

Ever thrown a penny into a fountain for good luck? The Romans used to do something even stranger with their pennies


Humans are a superstitious bunch and none more so than the ancient Romans. Recent studies have been able to date the practice of placing a "good luck" coin at the base of a new ship's mast back to the ancient Roman ship builders.

This practice of placing a so called "mast-step coin" at the base of a ship's mast was even prevalent well into the 20th century, with Turkish ship builders continuing the tradition as late as the mid-1980s. The concept, originally thought to be only nautical in nature, developed as a religious practice and was done as a sacrifice to the gods thereby ensuring the safe passage of the boat on it's future voyages.

Archeologists can now confirm the practice to be much more widely spread than just ships, with coins being found under mosaic pavements, inside doors, and at the base of structural pillars. Some of these finding date back to the 3rd century BC, proving that the Romans had been hedging their building bets for quite some time.

(Source)


Ever thrown a penny into a fountain for good luck? The Romans used to do something even stranger with their pennies


Humans are a superstitious bunch and none more so than the ancient Romans. Recent studies have been able to date the practice of placing a "good luck" coin at the base of a new ship's mast back to the ancient Roman ship builders.

This practice of placing a so called "mast-step coin" at the base of a ship's mast was even prevalent well into the 20th century, with Turkish ship builders continuing the tradition as late as the mid-1980s. The concept, originally thought to be only nautical in nature, developed as a religious practice and was done as a sacrifice to the gods thereby ensuring the safe passage of the boat on it's future voyages.

Archeologists can now confirm the practice to be much more widely spread than just ships, with coins being found under mosaic pavements, inside doors, and at the base of structural pillars. Some of these finding date back to the 3rd century BC, proving that the Romans had been hedging their building bets for quite some time.

(Source)

The Big Mac Index is a real economic indicator. Here's how it works

The Big Mac Index is a real economic indicator. Here's how it works


The exchange rates between world currencies can be a little misleading. While they are supposed to show the buying power of one currency versus another, there are many powerful market forces that serve to distort their actual value. So, if you are trying to compare cost levels in different countries, the exchange rate is not going to give you an accurate view. You need the Big Mac Index.

Created by 'The Economist' in 1986, the Big Mac Index attempts to measure what is known as Purchasing Power Parity (PPP), a measure of the relative buying power of currencies. The premise is that a US dollar should buy roughly the same in each country, but to measure this one needs something that is sold in most countries and is the same throughout them all. Enter the ubiquitous Big Mac.

By comparing the price of a Big Mac in various countries, it is possible to get a rough idea of the purchasing power of those countries relative to your own. Economists further use this index to measure whether a currency is overvalued, or undervalued when compared to their actual exchange rate.

The Big Mac Index started off as a fun way of explaining exchange rates, but now, some 28 years later, it is spoken about in both local bars and global economic forums.

(Source)


The Big Mac Index is a real economic indicator. Here's how it works


The exchange rates between world currencies can be a little misleading. While they are supposed to show the buying power of one currency versus another, there are many powerful market forces that serve to distort their actual value. So, if you are trying to compare cost levels in different countries, the exchange rate is not going to give you an accurate view. You need the Big Mac Index.

Created by 'The Economist' in 1986, the Big Mac Index attempts to measure what is known as Purchasing Power Parity (PPP), a measure of the relative buying power of currencies. The premise is that a US dollar should buy roughly the same in each country, but to measure this one needs something that is sold in most countries and is the same throughout them all. Enter the ubiquitous Big Mac.

By comparing the price of a Big Mac in various countries, it is possible to get a rough idea of the purchasing power of those countries relative to your own. Economists further use this index to measure whether a currency is overvalued, or undervalued when compared to their actual exchange rate.

The Big Mac Index started off as a fun way of explaining exchange rates, but now, some 28 years later, it is spoken about in both local bars and global economic forums.

(Source)

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