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Are you worried about getting old? No need to fret—according to scientists, time is actually an illusion


Physics is a field of study full of vastly confusing information. Some of this information, while scientifically provable, conflicts directly with our perception of reality. One theory, known as the Wave-particle duality of light, declares that light is both waves and particles at the same time. The concept, which dates back to the 17th century, is still as confounding for the man in the street today as it was back then.

It seems physicists have now done it again by suggesting that time does not actually exist. Patently, to human beings, time definitely exists. We wake in the morning, move through our day over a period of time and arrive back home at some point later. The old adage of "time waits for no man" seems to hold true. Or does it?

The trouble all started when Einstein's Theory of General Relativity, a theory that governs the physics of large scale, clashed with Quantum Physics, the field of study that attempts to describe the world of the tiny. This is where the Wave-particle duality first became verifiable. Physicists have for years been trying to unite these two competing areas of study by searching for a Grand Unification Equation, believing that things on both the large and small scale should ultimately be related.

A little over 40 years ago, two leading physicists, John Wheeler and Bryce DeWitt developed such an equation. However, it was immediately very contentious since, by working through the equation, the concept of time is removed. The equation, while tying up many loose ends, effectively proved that time did not exist at the most fundamental level of matter.

While the concept is baffling, it seems the physics may be correct, and what we perceive as "time" is really a measurable effect due to the motion of the large scale world around us. As one digs deeper and deeper into the small scale world of atoms, protons, and quantums, the concept of time becomes less relevant.

This thinking is summed up well by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The NIST is the guardian of the national atomic clock that provides the standard reference for all other clocks. The clock guardians claim that their clock does not measure time at all. Time is defined by the ticks of their clock, and is essentially a human creation allowing us to create order in our otherwise chaotic lives.

Physics would appear to agree with them.

(Source)

Are you worried about getting old? No need to fret—according to scientists, time is actually an illusion

Are you worried about getting old? No need to fret—according to scientists, time is actually an illusion


Physics is a field of study full of vastly confusing information. Some of this information, while scientifically provable, conflicts directly with our perception of reality. One theory, known as the Wave-particle duality of light, declares that light is both waves and particles at the same time. The concept, which dates back to the 17th century, is still as confounding for the man in the street today as it was back then.

It seems physicists have now done it again by suggesting that time does not actually exist. Patently, to human beings, time definitely exists. We wake in the morning, move through our day over a period of time and arrive back home at some point later. The old adage of "time waits for no man" seems to hold true. Or does it?

The trouble all started when Einstein's Theory of General Relativity, a theory that governs the physics of large scale, clashed with Quantum Physics, the field of study that attempts to describe the world of the tiny. This is where the Wave-particle duality first became verifiable. Physicists have for years been trying to unite these two competing areas of study by searching for a Grand Unification Equation, believing that things on both the large and small scale should ultimately be related.

A little over 40 years ago, two leading physicists, John Wheeler and Bryce DeWitt developed such an equation. However, it was immediately very contentious since, by working through the equation, the concept of time is removed. The equation, while tying up many loose ends, effectively proved that time did not exist at the most fundamental level of matter.

While the concept is baffling, it seems the physics may be correct, and what we perceive as "time" is really a measurable effect due to the motion of the large scale world around us. As one digs deeper and deeper into the small scale world of atoms, protons, and quantums, the concept of time becomes less relevant.

This thinking is summed up well by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The NIST is the guardian of the national atomic clock that provides the standard reference for all other clocks. The clock guardians claim that their clock does not measure time at all. Time is defined by the ticks of their clock, and is essentially a human creation allowing us to create order in our otherwise chaotic lives.

Physics would appear to agree with them.

(Source)


Dust off your TI-83: if you plot this mathematical formula, it will actually draw itself!


While studying the mathematical process of graphing formulae, Canadian mathematician Jeff Tupper developed a formula that could be used to convert a number into an arbitrary bitmap image.

The formula, known as Tupper's self-referential formula, is a mathematical inequality relationship that can actually be used to draw any image. However, when fed with a particular 543 digit number, called the "k" constant, the formula will actually plot itself.

The formula is mostly used for instructional purposes in a number of mathematics and computer science courses to demonstrate the concepts of self-reference and general graphing formulae, but can have other uses as well.

What the formula essentially does is convert the large input number into a sequence of points on a two dimensional graph. These dots on the graph come together to form a 17 pixel high by 106 pixel long bitmap picture recognisable by the human beings.

The value of "k" can be derived by drawing your chosen picture on the 17x106 matrix, reading off the binary number (dots are 1s and blanks are 0s), multiplying the result by 17 and then converting the output to an integer.

(Source)

Dust off your TI-83: if you plot this mathematical formula, it will actually draw itself!

Dust off your TI-83: if you plot this mathematical formula, it will actually draw itself!


While studying the mathematical process of graphing formulae, Canadian mathematician Jeff Tupper developed a formula that could be used to convert a number into an arbitrary bitmap image.

The formula, known as Tupper's self-referential formula, is a mathematical inequality relationship that can actually be used to draw any image. However, when fed with a particular 543 digit number, called the "k" constant, the formula will actually plot itself.

The formula is mostly used for instructional purposes in a number of mathematics and computer science courses to demonstrate the concepts of self-reference and general graphing formulae, but can have other uses as well.

What the formula essentially does is convert the large input number into a sequence of points on a two dimensional graph. These dots on the graph come together to form a 17 pixel high by 106 pixel long bitmap picture recognisable by the human beings.

The value of "k" can be derived by drawing your chosen picture on the 17x106 matrix, reading off the binary number (dots are 1s and blanks are 0s), multiplying the result by 17 and then converting the output to an integer.

(Source)


Walt Disney World might have been in St Louis were it not for a rude comment made at just the wrong time

Walt Disney World might have been in St Louis were it not for a rude comment made at just the wrong time


In November 1963, Walt Disney, seeing his Californian Disneyland development doing so well, decided to open a second attraction. By all accounts he had settled on the town of Saint Louis as the location for his next venture, but this all changed at a cocktail party the night before he was due to sign the deal.

At the party, the then head of Anheuser-Busch Breweries, August Busch Jr., Stated that any man who designs an attraction in Saint Louis, expecting it to be a success, but does not sell beer and liquor ought to have his head read. Apparently this statement insulted the wholesome family image Disney was cultivating and he left the following day never having signed the deal.

In reality, the story might well have been an elaborate ruse to hide what Disney was really up to. Disney needed to purchase vast tracts of land in Orlando for his new development, but was acutely aware of the fact that, once land owners got wind of his plans, they would drive real estate prices up.

The cocktail party story, coupled with other rumours that Disney was interested in Saint Louis, served to keep attention away from Orlando. Disney was able to purchase the required 43 square miles for just $5 million, and by 1965 Walt Disney World Orlando was on it's way to becoming the most visited attraction in the world.

(Source)


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