Page 3 - Fun Facts

When a pilot's aircraft entered into a flat spin, he ejected - only to watch the pilotless F-106 safely land itself in a Cornfield!


When pilot Gary Foust took his F-106A Delta Dart on a routine training flight on 2 February 1970, he had no way of knowing how bizarre his day would turn out to be.

He was conducting aerial combat maneuvers near Great Falls, Montana, when his aircraft entered into a flat spin.

Gary attempted a recovery but was unsuccessful. In desperation he deployed the drag chute but nothing seemed to do anything to recover the aircraft from the spin.

At an altitude of 15,000 feet Foust made the decision to fire his ejection seat. He managed to escape, but as he was floating down he saw his stricken aircraft successfully recover itself from the spin!

Foust’s ejection reduced the weight and the center of gravity of the aircraft, enabled it to recover itself and with its throttle at idle the pilot-less aircraft descended and skidded to a halt in a farmer’s cornfield near Big Sandy, Montana.

Gary drifter into the nearby mountains and was rescued by local residents.

There was so little damage on the ‘Cornfield Bomber’ that it was repaired and returned to service. It is now on display in the National Museum of the United States Air Force, where it has been since it was retired.

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A man became a millionaire in a special program of "Battle of the Sexes"!


1 vs. 100 is an American game show that was broadcast by NBC from 2006–08, and was revived on GSN with a new series which began in November 2010.

As in other formats, a single player (the 1) goes up against 100 other contestants (the "Mob"). The 1 gains money for every Mob member eliminated, but loses all winnings with an incorrect answer at any point.

On January 4, 2008, the first night of the current prize structure, one woman played against a mob of 100 men and vice versa. The woman, Katherine Kazorla lost $50,000 to the mob, while the man, Jason Luna, became the show's first (and only) million dollar winner.

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No need to tour Europe to go nature watching. All you need is a quick visit to the Smoky Mountains!


The Great Smoky Mountains are one of the United States' national treasures. The vast ranges, beautiful foliage and diverse animal life make it one of the best natural wonders.

Even seeing the vast natural wonder, it's hard to imagine that there are more species of trees in one acre of the Smoky Mountains than all of Northern Europe.

The park is one of the largest protected areas east of the Rocky Mountains at 500,000 acres full of trees, plants and animals.

It's so vast and diverse that a hike from a mountain's base to the peak can be compared to a 2,000 mile hike on the Appalachian Trail from Georgia to Maine in terms of the different plants and animals you'd see.

The National Park has 100 species of native trees and contains one of the largest areas of virgin deciduous forest in the entire North America. About 95 percent of the park is forested, with 25 percent of that completely undisturbed.

Some of the ancient wonders have records for being some of the largest trees around at over 20 feet in circumference. That is giant!

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Some awesome lists!

One of the ships used in Pirates of the Caribbean was sunk by Hurricane Sandy!


Bounty (popularly HMS Bounty) was an enlarged reconstruction of the original 1787 Royal Navy sailing ship HMS Bounty. Built in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia in 1960, she sank off the coast of North Carolina during Hurricane Sandy on 29 October 2012.

At one point in her life, lack of maintenance caused the vessel to temporarily lose her United States Coast Guard license, but Bounty was restored. The vessel's bottom planking was restored at the Boothbay Harbor Shipyard in 2002.

Moored in her winter home in St. Petersburg, Florida, she again became available for charter, excursions, sail-training, and movies including Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest and Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End.

This ship surely had a lot of action throughout it's life! May the ship rest in peace!

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Twin Popsicle ice pops became available during The Great Depression so that two kids could share it and pay only one nickel


The Popsicle® brand has been a household name in America for many years.

Popsicle® was accidentally invented in 1905 by Frank Epperson when he was 11 years old. He left a mixture of powdered soda, water, and a stirring stick in a cup on his porch during an exceptionally cold night, and found the frozen pop the next day.

It was an instant hit. Later, when he had kids of his own, they kept on asking for their dad’s ‘icicle’, but they always said “Pop’s ‘sicle,” so he changed the name from ‘Epsicle’ to Popsicle® in 1923 and applied for a patent.

During The Great Depression, times were very hard and of course Popsicle® became a luxury. To allow more kids to still enjoy the treat despite the financially difficult time, the Twin Popsicle® ice pop was invented. This meant that two kids could share an ice pop and only pay one nickel!

During WWII Popsicle® ice pops were chosen as the symbol of American life by the Eighth Air Force Unit. That is how much the brand was already ingrained in American society.

The very first “ice cream man” sold Popsicle® ice pops from a horse-drawn cart to children in Nebraska.

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