Page 7 - Interesting Facts

NBC's Hannibal is pushing the boundaries of nudity on network television. They way they're getting away with it is GROSS


Have you ever experienced one of those moments where you ask someone to stop doing something and all they do in response is do it differently? Unfortunately, one of the newer, exciting shows on television, Hannibal, attempted to do just that.

In one of the upcoming episodes, a couple is murdered and flayed. Their skin is cut in such a way to resemble the wings of angels. Of course, they were portrayed in the nude, visible butt cracks and all, so NBC had a bit of inhibition towards the sexual and violent imagery.

In order to solve this debacle, Fuller offered to "fill the butt cracks with blood." NBC, deciding that this would at least cover up some of the nudity in the scene, gave Fuller the "okay" to continue on even though whether or not the imagery was truly improved is still debatable. To many this still remains an offensive proposition, possibly even more so than its original content. Fuller's defense of his artistic choices was that "they were cracked in many ways, and their butt crack to me was a less offensive crack they were sporting."

Whether or not the butt cracks offend you, it is clear that the 2014 season of Hannibal will be exciting in every which way.

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What do 'The Twilight Zone' and 'I Am Legend' have in common? Find out here:


Richard Matheson wrote hundreds of works, whether they were novels, short stories, films or television shows. He is the author of the novel 'I Am Legend' which was later made into a feature film, and was also one of the main three writers for the show 'The Twilight Zone.'

He is responsible for the famous Twilight Zone episode 'Nightmare at 20,000 Feet.' He also wrote the opening and closing dialogs for all of his episodes, though he left the voiceover to the shows iconic voice of Rod Serling.

Matheson won some very prestigious awards throughout his career, including the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement in 1984 and the Bram Stoker Award for Lifetime Achievement from the Horror Writers Association in 1991. The Science Fiction Hall of Fame inducted him in 2010. He has also won World Fantasy Awards for best novel and best collection in 1975 and 1989, respectively.

Matheson died on June 23rd, 2013, just days before he was due to receive the Visionary award at the 39th Saturn Awards ceremony, and as a result the ceremony was dedicated to him. Many famous writers such as Stephen King and George A. Romero have attested to his influence, along with director Steven Spielberg. There's no doubt Richard Matheson will be missed in the world of storytelling.

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Having trouble sleeping? Going camping can help. Find out how


Would you believe it if you were told that we have a natural clock programmed into our body that is designed to wake us up and put us to sleep at the most ideal times?

Well, there is, and it is designed to put you asleep with the setting of the sun and wake you up with its rising. Any Boy Scout or outdoorsman could tell you that some of the most restful and natural sleep they've had is outside in the open air on a nice camping trip.

The reason people have such terrible sleep schedules and feel as groggy as they do when they awake is because of the difference in their external reality and their natural body clock. When we allow the two to function in sync, we experience the most beneficial sleep.

The only way to synchronize your internal clock and external reality is to live by natural light. That is why camping is so effective at giving us healthy sleep. Our bodies have the opportunity to follow the pattern of the setting and dawning of the sun.

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Some awesome lists!

This gold-medal-winning Olympian was once a King, and now cannot set foot in his own country!


The end of the 1800's and beginning of the 1900's were a time of Revolution throughout Europe. Lots of monarchies were overthrown and resulted in now Communist or Democratic governments. But it left a lot of displaced monarchs wondering "Now what?" One of whom was Constantine of Greece, formerly Constantine II, King of Hellenes.

Born June 2, 1940, Constantine grew into a noted sportsman, earning his home country of Greece it's first Olympic gold medal since 1912 in the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome for sailing. Constantine assumed the throne as King beginning in 1964, when he was still 23. In the same year, he married Danish Princess Anne-Marie of Denmark, a triple third cousin and sister of the current Danish queen, Margrethe II. However in 1973, a military junta displaced him from power.

A restoration of his power was set to a vote of the populace in 1974, after a royal edict he attempted failed to overthrow the government. The Greek plebiscite voted in favor of overthrowing the monarchy by a two-thirds vote. Living in exile, Constantine told his supporters to respect the decision of the populace. However, he still refused to officially abdicate the throne.

A law passed in 1994 stripped him of his Greek citizenship, passport, and property unless he adopted a surname. Constantine refused to comply. He still refers to himself as "King Constantine." He is one of ten displaced monarchs who still use their titles, claim rights to their thrones, and interact with other ex-royals in hopes of one day reclaiming their families' former glory throughout Europe.

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A town of 60 raised $400,000 from speeding tickets! How did they do it?


New Rome, Ohio, is a tiny village made up of 60 residents, located on the west side of Columbus. The roads outside the town post a 45 mph speed limit, but it drops down to 35 mph the moment you drive into the village.

The fourteen part-time policemen decided to take full advantage of this and would wait at the village's only stoplight to catch whoever wasn't following their posted speed limit. Not only did they ticket drivers for speeding, but also for minor offenses such as dusty taillights or improperly tinted windows!

Just how much was made from all of these tickets? Nearly $400,000 annually! Unfortunately for New Rome, it didn't last long. The village was legally dissolved and made part of a nearby township in 2004, and the speed trap came to an end.

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